07.06.14 | Tony Lewis, Jr Presents “Collateral Damage” A Photo Exhibition

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On Sunday, July 6th from 4-8 PM at Blind Whino (700 Delaware Ave SW, Washington, DC) noted DC philanthropist, youth advocate, and community leader Tony Lewis, Jr. will curate an exhibit entitled “Collateral Damage.” The exhibit will feature photos of the “other” faces of incarceration. It will highlight the individuals often forgotten and left to bare the pain of having a loved one jailed. An artistic demonstration, in which both Lewis and Photographer, Mark Thomas of Capture the Capital will shed further light on the impact of mass incarceration on families living within the DC metro area and attempt to tell their stories through the visual medium of photography.

When asked about the reason behind curating such an event, Tony states

“The motivation behind this exhibit was to illustrate the hardship of having an incarcerated family member and advocate for resources aimed to support those people; in particular the children. It is about exploring the mental and emotional anguish that these people experience during the incarceration of their family member who could be their parent, spouse, aunt, uncle, or sibling. These people are in need of resources centered around mental health, education and mentoring services. Incarceration is a family experience; we all do the time just some of us remain in freedom.”

RSVP for the event now at collateraldamagedc@gmail.com

Former Mayor, Marion Barry Pens New Book “Mayor for Life” and Holds Downtown DC Book Signing


Community Advocate, Civil Rights Activist and Former DC Mayor, Marion Barry held a book signing event on Tuesday at the downtown Barnes and Noble Bookstore. The event was your standard book signing event but the Barnes and Noble staff did a wonderful job of keeping the crowds of people organized and moving. As people trickled in for the 6PM signing many of them were anxious to meet with the former Mayor. One lady I spoke to was so excited that she had actually left her office earlier that day just to purchase her copy of the book and return to work; she stated how she wanted to be certain that her book was signed. Another young lady had purchased multiple copies for herself, her grandmother and mother.


As time progressed on past the hour, crowds of patrons poured into the second level of the bookstore. While waiting, I was drawn into several different conversations with people from all around the DC metro area. I spoke with one woman from the Eastern Shores of Maryland. She told me how she had traveled across the Bay bridge with her great grandnephew just to bring him to meet the illustrious Mayor. She boasted about how they’d been practicing a firm handshake and she even instructed her nephew (who appeared to be maybe 5 or 6 years of age) to “give her the Barry-shake, y’know the one you’re going to give Mr. Barry.”

When the former Mayor finally arrived, one by one supporters lined up eager to shower him with Thank yous and celebrate the release of his latest book. I linked up with a few supporters from the event who graciously shared their thoughts on the Mayor and why they purchased his book.

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Chesley S.

“I came to get the book because I believe he has transformed DC and he is really a leading African-American figure in this country. I admire the work that he has done for everybody and I feel like he has placed people before himself. He is truly an inspirational figure for myself and I know for many others in Washington, DC and afar.”

 

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Keijon W.

 “I grew up in DC, born and raised in North East so he’s been my “Mayor for Life”, basically. Plus my Aunt and everybody wanted the book so they sent me down here to get them.”

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Dorset L.

“I purchased the book because he is the “Mayor for Life”, you have to have his book. A book about the person who basically helped grow this city. I love him, and people need to know what he did for the people of Washington, DC. Regardless, if it was black, white or whatever; it didn’t make a difference, he was always there for the people. Washington, DC stands for the people and he stood for the people. Regardless of what the situation was he was there for you. [Longtime DC resident] I’m from NW Washington, DC and I remember when he was with his first wife, Mary Treadwell. My family was apart of the PRIDE program and worked with him on his campaign.”

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Patrick C.

“I’ve been in the city [Washington, DC] for 35 years and I think Marion Barry is one of the greatest politicians of my lifetime.”

Everyone I had spoken to shared the same sentiments of admiration and gratitude for the impact Mayor Marion Barry had made, not only in their lives as individuals but within their communities as a whole. I strongly believe that the greatness of a city is found in its people and the people are a reflection of their leadership.

The people have spoken and Mayor Marion Barry is indeed DC’s “Mayor For life.”

Gateway DC Summer Film Series

gateway1The Analog Underground has partnered with the DC Office of Motion Picture & Television Development (MPTD) and the Ward 8 Arts & Culture Council to bring forth the Gateway DC Summer Film Series.

Beginning June 25th patrons can enjoy 8 weeks of free outdoor film screenings at the St. Elizabeths Gateway Pavilion.

The eight week film showcase, will feature commercial and independent films across a variety of genres paired with special programming and community events that support each week’s theme. In addition to the film screenings, pre-screening programming and festivities will include live music, contests, special giveaways, performances, and special media demonstrations.

There will also be informational booths set up to promote community non-profit and government programs and initiatives. Food trucks and a variety of vendors will be onsite. However, attendees are welcome to bring their own food and beverages.

All events are free and open to the public.

For more information visit GatewayFilmsDC.com

4 ways to stay involved after the 2014 National Day of Service

mlkjJanuary 20, 2014 is the US federal holiday dedicated to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his legacy of service. The day provides a perfect opportunity for Americans to honor Dr. King’s dream of civic engagement by getting out into their communities and making a difference. MLK Day doesn’t stop on January 20th it is a philosophy of service that should be carried on throughout the year. Here are a few simple ways to put action into play on Dr. Kings’ dream:

 

Volunteer

Support your community by volunteering  at a local soup kitchen; food bank, public library, nursing home, homeless or animal shelter.

Advocate

Let your voice be a tool used for change. You can join several organizations that specialize in advocacy, sign a petition for change via change.org or hand out flyers with useful information. You can even sit on your community or town hall as a volunteer board member.

Organize

Become a leader in your neighborhood and gather support for community forums, town hall meetings, community clean up, feed the homeless initiatives.

Donate

Apart from money; the most valuable thing you can donate is your time. With so many underserved youth out there you can make an impact by signing up to mentor at a boys and girls club or other mentorship programs.

Donating clothing , furniture or your car to goodwill and/or charity orgs.

Sharing your knowledge  through tutoring a child or teaching a class at a local learning center.

Make an impact by sharing resources with women’s shelters and non-profit groups that support the disabled or visually impaired (Columbia lighthouse for the blind). Donating computers and practical items such as desks, chairs and toiletries can always help further initiatives.

Visit AllForGood.org  or the UnitedWay.org to find more opportunities in your area.

These are just a few ideas but if you know of any other ways to stay involved and would like to share; comment below.

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A few facts about MLK National Day of Service:

After a long struggle, legislation was signed in 1983 creating a federal holiday marking the birthday of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In 1994, Congress designated the Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Holiday as a national day of service and charged the Corporation for National and Community Service with leading this effort.  Taking place each year on the third Monday in January, the MLK Day of Service is the only federal holiday observed as a national day of service – a “day on, not a day off.” The MLK Day of Service is a part of United We Serve, the President’s national call to service initiative.  It calls for Americans from all walks of life to work together to provide solutions to our most pressing national problems.  The MLK Day of Service empowers individuals, strengthens communities, bridges barriers, creates solutions to social problems, and moves us closer to Dr. King’s vision of a “Beloved Community.”

Information Courtesy of MLK.gov