Women’s History Month Spotlight: Yulia Brodskaya

                                                                    Simple Complexity.
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Paper always held a special fascination for me. I’ve tried many different methods and techniques of working with it, until I found the way that has turned out to be ‘the one’ for me: now I draw with paper instead of on it.

There isn’t anything complex about paper and glue yet illustrator, Yulia Brodskaya, has used her creative genius to construct intricate and vibrant 3-dimensional pieces using paper and glue, these same elements have quickly garnered her international recognition. Having over 100 pieces in her collection she has worked for big names like: Oprah, Starbucks, Godiva, Bentley, Niemen Marcus, Hennessy, Target and several others (To name familiar US companies). Born in 1983, making her just over 30, she began working as a graphic designer and illustrator in 2006 and quickly left graphic design for her real passion. She accrued over 100 clients within 5 years. If there were any woman illustrators worth highlighting it would be Yulia. Her attention to detail, the meticulous nature of the pieces, her vibrancy of color and emotion all come across clearly in her work. Each piece quite visually pleasing, her work became a muse of inspiration:

I see the culmination of emotion from a lifetime in your face like a tree that has stood the test of time. With lines that circle the trunk round and round so too do the lines on your face tell a story…they tell a truth: Our perception of reality happens in dots and lines and with care and attention we can craft a beautiful reality that celebrates our experience in all of its colors. So be like Yulia, bravely stretching the bounds and lines of art, the bounds and lines of life.

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Dannielle Cayard is a poet, vocalist and free spirit who uses her creativity to guide her audience deep into the corridors of her beautiful mind.

She is also a Mousai House member and Written Expressions contributor.

 

 

 

Dorothy Dandridge : A Star on the Rise

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Dorothy Dandridge was a woman of magnificent beauty and extraordinary talent, who dreamed of one day reaching the upper echelon of Hollywood as an dramatic actress. In 1954, that dream came true when she was cast as the lead in Otto Preminger’s Carmen Jones, the first all-black musical filmed in Technicolor. Not only was the movie a success, but Dorothy received acclaim for her portrayal of Carmen Jones, becoming Hollywood’s first African American dramatic female movie star. She was also the first African American woman to grace the cover of Life magazine.
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On February 12, 1954 Dorothy received an Oscar nomination for Best Actress, making her the first African American actress to receive such an honor. On March 30, 1955 Dorothy attended the 27th Annual Academy Awards with her sister Vivian. The night was a historic one for many reasons. Dorothy was not only the first African American woman nominated for Best Actress, but also the first African American actress to present an award.

Though she did not win the Oscar, Dorothy captivated the hearts of the country, and symbolized the hopes and dreams of African Americans everywhere. With the tremendous success of Carmen Jones, one would assume Dorothy Dandridge would remain one the top actresses in Hollywood. Unfortunately, Hollywood was too focused on her skin color instead of her talent. Three years pasted before Dorothy starred in another film. In 1957, she appeared apart of an ensemble cast in the movie Island in the Sun. She starred in other movies including The Decks Ran Red (1958), Tamango (1958), Porgy and Bess (1959) and Malaga (1960), but none received the acclaim and garnered the popularity of Carmen Jones.
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As Diahann Carroll said, “Dorothy Dandridge should be the most successful movie star in the world, but she was a black woman at the wrong time.” She captivated the world with her beauty, and amazed audiences everywhere with her undeniable talent . Most importantly she inspired and blazed the trail for generations of actors and entertainers. Though her influence doesn’t end there. It’s broad enough to reach just about any and everyone including me. Dorothy dared to dream big, and accomplished what seemed virtually impossible during the 1950s. Her dreams our now our realities, and I am forever grateful.

 

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M. Williams is a guest contributor and curator behind the @DandridgeLove Blog.

Williams has always had a great love and admiration for Dorothy. When she realized that so many in this generation didn’t know who she was, or the rich legacy she left behind. She started an Instagram, Twitter and Tumblr in hopes of increasing awareness about her life and legacy. Williams’s goal has always been to uplift the legacy of Dorothy Dandridge, by acknowledging her triumphs as well as her trials. Dorothy has opened the door for so many women especially of color. Williams believes it is our duty to celebrate her because not only did Dandridge break down countless barriers but she has inspired others to do the same. M. Williams hopes in time Dorothy’s legacy will not only be more widely known, but truly appreciated.

Google Salutes Civil and Women’s Rights Activist Dorothy Height


Google is known for having some of the best and most creative homepages. They often showcase an iconic individual or a specific day in time in which an interesting event has occurred. Mostly all the images featured have some cool historical reference. In today’s featured image they honor Civil and Women’s Rights activist Dorothy Irene Height.

In keeping with this month’s theme, it only makes sense to feature a women with her level of excellence. Dorothy Height would’ve turned 102 years old this very day. She transitioned on April 20th, 2010 just one month after her 98th Birthday. Although she’s transitioned, her initiatives and legacy still live on. Dr. Height fought for rights of women and especially African-American women; in relation to education, voting rights and unemployment.

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Dorothy Height is a true Street Intellectual who fearlessly fought for justice and human rights, that is why we honor her memory as well, by acknowledging her contributions to American history .